All Natural Herbal Easter Egg Dying

Herbal Easter Egg Dye
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Spring time is here.

I ADORE spring. Things begin to grow again in the garden, itty bitty animal babies are born, and of course, my ultimate favorite, free candy at Easter, and an amazing seder at Passover.

I love any chance to be creative, and that includes dying eggs.

Now that I have a little one, I definitely want to share experiences I had as a child.

I thought it would be a lot of fun to do an herbal challenge and decorate eggs using just things found in the garden.

Here are some fun ways to dye eggs.

Red-cabbage dye: 4 cups chopped cabbage
Turmeric dye: 3 tablespoons turmeric
Onion-skin dye: 4 cups onion skins (skins of about 12 onions)
Beet dye: 4 cups chopped beets
Coffee dye: 1 quart strong black coffee (instead of water)

Color Codes

Deep Gold: Boil eggs in turmeric solution, 30 minutes.
Sienna: Boil eggs in onion-skin solution, 30 minutes.
Dark, Rich Brown: Boil eggs in black coffee, 30 minutes.
Pale Yellow: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30 minutes.
Orange: Soak eggs in room-temperature onion-skin solution, 30 minutes.
Light Brown: Soak eggs in room-temperature black coffee, 30 minutes.
Light Pink: Soak eggs in room-temperature beet solution, 30 minutes.
Light Blue: Soak eggs in room-temperature cabbage solution, 30 minutes.
Royal Blue: Soak eggs in room-temperature cabbage solution overnight.
Lavender: Soak eggs in room-temperature beet solution, 30 minutes. Follow with room-temperature cabbage solution, 30 seconds.
Chartreuse: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30 minutes. Follow with room-temperature cabbage solution, 5 seconds.
Salmon: Soak eggs in room-temperature turmeric solution, 30 minutes. Follow with room-temperature onion-skin solution, 30 minutes.

 

DYING METHODS

  1. Remove eggs with spoon, pat dry with paper towels, and let dry on a wire rack. The cold-dipping method produces subtle, translucent shades, but can result in uneven coloring unless the eggs are rotated vigilantly while in the dye.
  2. With this method, the eggs and the ingredients for the dye are boiled separately. Using a metal spoon, lower cooled hard-boiled eggs into a bowl of cooled dye, and let them soak for as little as 5 seconds or as long as overnight, depending on the depth of color you desire. Remove eggs with spoon, pat dry with paper towels, and let dry on a wirerack.
  3. This method involves boiling the eggs with the dye; the heat allows the dye to saturate the shells, resulting in intense, more uniform color. Set raw eggs in a pot of strained dye; bring to a boil for the amount of time specified in our color glossary (see below). Remove and dry eggs as with the cold-dipping method.

Now for my favorite. The decorating. My favorite ways to decorate are coloring straight on the egg with a black marker (ala Zentangles) or using foliage to create a stamp of sorts.

Zentangle Eggs

For the sake of herbal and earthy, I chose to go with the herbal stamping. Here is some photos of the process:

1

Pick your favorite foliage and space them out the way you want on your egg.

2

Using an old cut up stocking seal it tightly.

3

Tie tightly in a knot

4

Toss your eggs in whatever mixture you wish.
TADA! Awesome Herbal Easter Eggs.

We would LOVE to see your eggs this season!

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